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All about bikes

How have bicycles changed our world now and then? (Part 4)

British musician Henry Dacre made a big hit on both sides of the Atlantic in 1892 with Daisy Bell and the famous chorus a bicycle built for two. Writer H.G. Wells, an avid cyclist, and a keen social watcher have written several bicycle novels with soothing stories surrounding the romantic, free, and inclusive possibilities of this wonderful new form of shipping.

Wells is not alone in seeing the role bicycles play in shaping the future. Young people cycling in New York’s Central Park in 1942. After storming the world in the 1890s, bicycles were soon dropped as a kind of “toy” when their umbrella gradually prevailed.

Cyclists paved the way for the age of the automobile

It was the millions of cyclists plus one of the nation’s largest industries at the time that created the political momentum that led to rapid improvements in rural roads and roads. Indeed, cyclists paved the way for the age of the automobile – which no one could have anticipated at that time.

The first bicycle-only trails

Brooklyn opened one of the first bicycle-only trails in 1895 – the route from Prospect Park to Coney Island. About 10,000 cyclists used it on the first day of its inauguration. Two years later, New York City enacted the country’s first traffic law to deal with the growing number of speed ghosts on bicycles.

Teddy Roosevelt, the city police commissioner, introduces the police team to use bicycles with the ability to arrest speed drivers. Until that time, the classic bicycle was still the fastest vehicle on the road.

However, that’s just temporary. Before the decade ended, cyclists on both sides of the Atlantic discovered that stretch tires, chain drives, and bearings could be combined with engines to make faster cars. Although it is not quite, it does not have the advantages of low operating costs like bicycles, but it is more enjoyable and more profitable for the seller.

In Dayton, Ohio, bicyclists Wilbur and Orville Wright are exploring the idea of ​​a machine that weighs more than air, tying wings for a bicycle to test its aerodynamics. Costs for the studies are covered by profits from their bike shop.

Back in the town of Coventry, in the north of England, James Kemp Starley, who created the Rover safety bike suddenly died in 1901 at the age of 46. Then his company moved from the modest bikes to motorcycles and eventually cars. This seems to be the way of the future: In America, another former cyclist named Henry Ford transitioned from bicycles to motorcycles and cars and ushered in the automotive era.