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All about bikes

How were bicyles in the 19th century?

The invention of bicycles has had a great impact on society, both in culture and in promoting the industrialization of modernization. Thanks to bicycles, many modern vehicles such as cars and motorcycles were later invented.

So, how were bicycle look like in the 19th century?

E.C.F. bike model Otto in 1880

In 1885, John Kemp Starley, the grandson of inventor James Starley, created a safety bicycle with two equal-sized wheels mounted in an empty metal frame. The car is fully equipped with parts such as brakes, chain-drive sleds. This is the prototype of a modern bike. Approximately 2 to 3 years later, this model was put into mass production and widely available.

The Rover model was invented by John Kemp Starley (grandson of James Starley) in 1885.

In 1888, Scottish inventor John Dunlop invented pneumatic tires for bicycles. This tire allows the bike to operate more smoothly and smoothly on rough roads, overcoming the disadvantages of solid tires. After that, people also found a model of the frame design called “diamond” with better bearing capacity.

The design of a pneumatic tire and a simple “diamond” frame makes the bike lightweight for smoother, more efficient operation. At the same time, the aforementioned improvements also facilitate maintenance and repair become more convenient.

John Dunlop (1840 -1921) invented the pneumatic tire. He is the founder of the famous Dunlop company specializing in manufacturing tires and sports equipment.

With important aspects of being easy to navigate, safe, comfortable and moving quickly, bicycles became a popular means of transportation for the middle and upper classes in Europe and North America in the second half. 1890. A bicycle with an equally sized rubber tire mounted on a frame with “diamond design” was the first bicycle model for both men and women.

It can be used smoothly. This period was a golden age in the history of bicycle development with a series of improvements that contributed to the completion of today’s modern bicycle model.