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Motorcycle Racing

The largest motorbike racing events in the world (Part 1)

Motorbike racing has become a sport in which riders are trained strictly and seriously, and the quality of each bike will be shown in these races.

Traditional Road

Traditional Road refers to the motorbike races taking place on the street. Currently, the number of roads that can be organized for street motorcycle races has decreased and most of them are concentrated in European countries. Examples of typical street bike races are the International Road Racing Championship and Duke Road Racing Rankings.

In addition, there are smaller races organized according to the purchase of prizes with prizes for outstanding racing winners such as Isle of Man TT, North West 200 and Ulster Grand Prix. Ireland currently hosts the most street races. Besides, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Ukraine, New Zealand and Macau.

Motorcycle Grand Prix

Commonly known as the MotoGP, the world MotoGP motorcycle racing competition can be organized into three separate segments: Moto3, Moto2 and MotoGP.

Moto3 was launched in 2012 for 250cc segment motorcycles with 4-stroke single cylinder engine. Previously, Moto3 also allowed the 125cc segment. In Moto3 races, the age of the riders will be limited from 25 to 28 years old.

Moto2 was introduced by Dorna Sports, which currently holds the edition of the MotoGP formula competitions, in 2010 for the 4-stroke 600cc segment. Previously the Moto2 formula also included 250cc 2-stroke motorcycles. In the first season, Moto2 allowed 2-stroke and 2-stroke engines to participate. But in 2011 only 4-stroke engine types to this day.

The current MotoGP world motorcycle racing tournament is the racing formula for the largest displacement bike. This race has been controversial and changed with the engine regulations during the early years of the organization.

In 2002, 990cc 4-stroke engines were allowed to compete between 500cc 2-stroke models. And until 2003, completely replaced the whole 2-stroke model. In 2007, MotoGP reduced the engine capacity to 800cc and failed before setting the standard to allow only 1000cc 4 stroke engines in 2012 and to this day.